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Long-term physiological and growth responses of Himalayan fir to environmental change are mediated by mean climate
Panthi, Shankar; Fan, Ze-Xin; van der Sleen, Peter3; Zuidema, Pieter A.
2020
Source PublicationGLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY
ISSN1354-1013
AbstractHigh-elevation forests are experiencing high rates of warming, in combination with CO2 rise and (sometimes) drying trends. In these montane systems, the effects of environmental changes on tree growth are also modified by elevation itself, thus complicating our ability to predict effects of future climate change. Tree-ring analysis along an elevation gradient allows quantifying effects of gradual and annual environmental changes. Here, we study long-term physiological (ratio of internal to ambient CO2, i.e., C-i/C-a and intrinsic water-use efficiency, iWUE) and growth responses (tree-ring width) of Himalayan fir (Abies spectabilis) trees in response to warming, drying, and CO2 rise. Our study was conducted along elevational gradients in a dry and a wet region in the central Himalaya. We combined dendrochronology and stable carbon isotopes (delta C-13) to quantify long-term trends in C-i/C-a ratio and iWUE (delta C-13-derived), growth (mixed-effects models), and evaluate climate sensitivity (correlations). We found that iWUE increased over time at all elevations, with stronger increase in the dry region. Climate-growth relations showed growth-limiting effects of spring moisture (dry region) and summer temperature (wet region), and negative effects of temperature (dry region). We found negative growth trends at lower elevations (dry and wet regions), suggesting that continental-scale warming and regional drying reduced tree growth. This interpretation is supported by delta C-13-derived long-term physiological responses, which are consistent with responses to reduced moisture and increased vapor pressure deficit. At high elevations (wet region), we found positive growth trends, suggesting that warming has favored tree growth in regions where temperature most strongly limits growth. At lower elevations (dry and wet regions), the positive effects of CO2 rise did not mitigate the negative effects of warming and drying on tree growth. Our results raise concerns on the productivity of Himalayan fir forests at low and middle (<3,300 m) elevations as climate change progresses.
Keywordcentral Himalaya climate change elevation gradients high-elevation forests Himalayan fir (Abies spectabilis) intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) long-term growth trends tree rings
Subject AreaBiodiversity & Conservation ; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
DOI10.1111/gcb.14910
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS IDWOS:000500595200001
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.xtbg.org.cn/handle/353005/11535
Collection2012年后新成立研究组
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, CAS Key Lab Trop Forest Ecol, Mengla, Yunnan, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Acad Sci, Ctr Plant Ecol, Xishuangbanna, Peoples R China
3.Chinese Acad Sci, Ailaoshan Stn Subtrop Forest Ecosystem Studies, Jingdong, Yunnan, Peoples R China
4.Karlsruhe Inst Technol, Dept Wetland Ecol, Rastatt, Germany
5.Zuidema, Pieter A.] Wageningen Univ, Forest Ecol & Forest Management Grp, Wageningen, Netherlands
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Panthi, Shankar,Fan, Ze-Xin,van der Sleen, Peter,et al. Long-term physiological and growth responses of Himalayan fir to environmental change are mediated by mean climate[J]. GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY,2020.
APA Panthi, Shankar,Fan, Ze-Xin,van der Sleen, Peter,&Zuidema, Pieter A..(2020).Long-term physiological and growth responses of Himalayan fir to environmental change are mediated by mean climate.GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY.
MLA Panthi, Shankar,et al."Long-term physiological and growth responses of Himalayan fir to environmental change are mediated by mean climate".GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY (2020).
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